How Do You Report a Dog Bite to Animal Control in Central Illinois?

If you are a dog owner or have ever been bitten by a dog, you might have heard of the “one bite rule.” It’s a legal concept that applies in many states in the United States.

However, it’s not applicable in Illinois.

In this blog post, we’ll explain the one bite rule and how Illinois handles dog bite cases.

What Is the One Bite Rule?

The one bite rule is a legal concept that requires a person to prove that the dog’s owner knew or should have known their dog was dangerous or aggressive. The rule suggests that a dog gets one “free bite” before the owner can be held liable for any injuries the dog inflicts on others.

In other words, if the dog has not bitten anyone before, the owner cannot be held responsible for the first bite.

The idea behind the one bite rule is that dog owners should have a chance to learn about their dog’s temperament before being held responsible for their pet’s actions. If the dog has a history of aggression, the owner should take steps to protect others from the dog.

How Illinois Handles Dog Bite Cases

Unlike many other states, Illinois does not follow the one bite rule. If a dog bites someone in Illinois, the owner or person in control of the dog can be held liable for any injuries caused by the animal. The Illinois Animal Control Act governs dog bite cases in the state.

According to this law, the individual who was bitten can recover damages from the owner or person controlling the dog, even if it’s the dog’s first bite.

However, there are two conditions to recovering damages:

  1. The individual must not have provoked the dog.
  2. The individual must have been peaceably conducting themselves where they had a right to be

Illinois law places the responsibility on the dog owner to keep their pet under control and prevent any harm it may cause. Therefore, if a dog bites someone, the owner or person in control of the dog can be held liable for any injuries caused, regardless of the dog’s history of aggression.

Advantages of Illinois Law

Illinois law is more favorable to those bitten by dogs than the laws of several other states. In states that follow the one bite rule, proving that the dog’s owner knew or should have known that the dog was dangerous can be challenging. Individuals may rely on the dog’s past behavior to prove their case.

In Illinois, those bitten do not need to prove that the dog has a history of aggression or violence. This means that they can recover damages even if the dog has never bitten anyone before.

Contact Onward Injury Law Today

Illinois does not follow the one bite rule. If a dog bites someone in Illinois, the owner or person in control of the dog can be held liable for any injuries caused by the animal, regardless of the dog’s history of aggression.

The Illinois Animal Control Act places the responsibility on the dog owner to keep their pet under control and prevent any harm it may cause. If a dog in Illinois has bitten you, you may be entitled to compensation. Please contact a dog bite lawyer at Onward Injury Law today for a FREE case review.

Author Bio

Josh Rohrscheib

Joshua Rohrscheib is the Owner of Onward Injury Law, a Central Illinois personal injury law firm. With more than 17 years of experience in injury law, he is dedicated to representing clients in a wide range of legal matters, including car accidents, trucking accidents, construction accidents, medical malpractice, nursing home abuse, and other personal injury cases.

Josh received his Juris Doctor from the University of Illinois College of Law and is a member of the Illinois State Bar Association. He has received numerous accolades for his work, including being named among the “Top 40 Under 40” in 2019 by The National Trial Lawyers and a “Rising Star” in 2019 by Super Lawyers.

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